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Dr. Tobias Rupprecht

Rupprecht-Katy Otto 2021_2

JRG Peripheral Liberalism, Freie Universität Berlin

Postdoctoral Researcher, Head of the Junior Research Group "Peripheral Liberalism", BGTS Faculty

Address
Edwin-Redslob-Str. 29
14195 Berlin

Tobias is a global historian with a particular interest in the history of (state) socialism and (neo)liberalism. His research has mostly addressed Soviet and Eastern European encounters with the Global South, and economic reform debates in socialist countries. He taught both Russian and Latin American history in Denmark and the UK before joining Scripts in 2020 to study economists and marketisation debates in Eastern Europe and China in the late 20th century.

See also: https://fu-berlin.academia.edu/TobiasRupprecht

Research Interests

  • Global History
  • History of (state) socialism, esp Soviet history
  • History of (neo)liberalism
  • Latin American history, esp modern Chilean history


Current Research projects at SCRIPTS


The 'Peripheral Liberalism' group assesses the intellectual development and political impact of liberal ideas before and during the marketisation of (formerly) state socialist countries. It revisits debates on the expansion of markets and private property amongst economists, social scientists and dissidents in the Soviet Union/Russia, in Eastern Europe, and in China, in their transnational context from the 1970s to the 1990s. Marketisation was not usually envisioned as a wholesale import of the Western liberal model; both historical and contemporary models of authoritarian transition in other 'peripheral' countries provided inspiration, too. The group reconsiders the local intellectual roots and the non-Western exchange of ideas of political economy - within the socialist world but also in exchange with development dictatorships from Chile to South Korea. It also explores the counterreactions to these liberals, who were 'peripheral' in their national contexts, too: they were often marginal figures, politically influential for a while but usually confronted with hostile political elites and majorities of the population. 'Peripheral Liberalism' thus seeks to contribute to a better understanding of the genesis of modern hybrid regimes in much of the former socialist world that currently challenge the Western liberal script with a vengeance.

Monographs

Iacob, B., Mark, J., Spaskovska, L. and Rupprecht, T. 2019, ‘1989’. A Global History of Eastern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Rupprecht, T. 2015, Soviet Internationalism after Stalin. Interaction and Exchange between the Soviet Union and Latin America during the Cold War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Recent articles and chapters (selection)

Rupprecht, T. 2020, ‘Global Varieties of Neoliberalism. Debates on Free Markets and Strong States in late 20th Century Russia and Chile’, in: Global Perspectives 1.

Rupprecht, T. 2020, ‘Pinochet in Prague. Authoritarian Visions of Economic Reforms and the State in Eastern Europe, 1980–2000’, in: Journal of Modern European History 3, pp. 312-323.

Rupprecht, T. 2020, ‘Latin American “Tercermundistas” in the Soviet Union. Paradise Lost and Found’, in: Thomas Field et. al. (eds.): Latin America and the Global Cold War. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, pp. 221-239.

Mark, J. & Rupprecht, T. 2019, ‘The Socialist World in Global History. From Absentee to Victim to Co-producer’, in: Matthias Middell (ed.): The Practice of Global History. London: Bloomsbury, pp. 81-113.

Rupprecht, T. 2019, ‘The General on his Journeys. Augusto Pinochet’s International Trips and Diverging Transnational Justice and Memory Agendas in the Aftermath of the Cold War’, in: Global Society 33, pp. 419-435.

Rupprecht, T. 2018, ‘Orthodox Internationalism. State and Church in Modern Russia and Ethiopia’, in: Comparative Studies in Society and History 1, pp. 212-235.

Rupprecht, T. 2018, ‘Globalisation and Internationalism beyond the North Atlantic. Soviet-Brazilian Encounters and Interactions during the Cold War’, in: Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo and José Pedro Monteiro (eds.): Internationalism, Imperialism and the Formation of the Contemporary World. London: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 327-351.