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Anticolonial Solidarity: Political Theory and Global History in Dialogue (Limited Access)

Jul 15, 2021 - Jul 16, 2021

The workshop “Anticolonial Solidarity: Political Theory and Global History in Dialogue” commences an interdisciplinary dialogue on the question—what is anticolonial solidarity? It is important to pose this question now. Appeals to “solidarity” proliferate among politicians and public health officials seeking to legitimate otherwise unpopular mobility restrictions. Their dominant picture of solidarity in nationalist-communitarian and liberal-internationalist frameworks, however, contrasts with the vibrant history and present of transnational anticolonial solidarity movements. Engaged citizens and activists continue to contest local injustices rooted in global structures of European imperialism—from the so-called Mediterranean “refugee crisis” and India’s stripping of Kashmir’s special status, to the invasion of indigenous territory from Standing Rock to Unist’o’ten. From this perspective, rhetoricalinsistence on an urgent need for solidarity elides the history and present of more radical, transformative practices of anticolonial solidarity. We thus propose to approach our question by thinking about both solidarity and anticolonialism together, as well as reflecting on the importance of histories of freedom and/or oppression in the formation of contemporary solidarities.

The workshop is organized by Dr. Jared Holley.

INVITED SPEAKERS INCLUDE

 

Prof. Cemil Aydin, Global History (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill)

Dr. Nicole CuUnjieng Aboitiz, World History (Clare Hall, Cambridge)

Prof. Robin Celikates Social Philosophy (FU Berlin; Transforming Solidarities)

Dr. Jeanette Ehrmann, Political Theory (University of Gießen)  

Dr. Cindy Ewing, Global History (University of Toronto)

Prof. Michael Goebel, International History, (Graduate Institute of Geneva)

Prof. David Owen, Political Theory (University of Southampton)

Prof. Inés Valdez, Political Theory (Ohio State / LMU Munich)

Prof. Gary Wilder, Anthropology and History (CUNY Graduate Centre)